Brown v. Board of Ed – Quiz

 

Waiting to view the arguments at the Supreme Court in the Brown case

Waiting to view the arguments at the Supreme Court in the Brown case

The NAACP legal team devised a formula for success. As they organized cases the first requirement was that they involve multiple plaintiffs. Along their road to the U.S. Supreme Court five cases were developed from the states of Delaware, Kansas, Virginia, South Carolina and Washington, D.C.  None of these cases succeeded in the District Courts and all were appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court. At this juncture they were combined and became known jointly as Oliver L. Brown et.al. vs the Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas. (source: Brown Foundation)

 

 

Brown v. Board of Ed

5 Questions – Brown v. Board of Ed


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Brown v. Board Historic Site

Brown v. Board Historic Site

 

 

 

 

 

U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Brown v. Bd of Education of Topeka, ended school segregation

U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Brown v. Bd of Education of Topeka, ended school segregation

Charles Hamilton Houston argued most of the early NAACP cases. He had been the Dean of Howard Law School, a prestigious university for African Americans. He was teacher and mentor for many civil rights lawyers of that time including Thurgood Marshall. Houston died in 1950 leaving Thurgood Marshall as lead strategist and council for the school integration cases. Marshall led these cases all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. As a result, one hundred and five years after the 1849 Roberts case, on May 17, 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a unanimous decision that segregation was unconstitutional and violated the 14th Amendment.

The Brown decision initiated educational reform throughout the United States and was a catalyst in launching the modern Civil Rights Movement. Bringing about change in the years since Brown continues to prove difficult. But the Brown v. Board of Education victory brought Americans one step closer to true freedom and equal rights (source: Brown Foundation).

 

 

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