Juneteenth

Terms for the end of Civil War hostilities began at a courthouse in Virginia in April of 1865, but it didn’t end in Texas until June later that year. Slaves continued to work and personal freedoms were ignored because no one got the word.  No social media, no media of any kind, no newspapers for slaves who of course were not allowed to read (outlawed by the Slave Codes). General Robert E. Lee, commander of …

Continue reading

Success Can Change Everything

It’s been said that one of Justice Thurgood Marshall’s favorite justices was Justice John Marshall Harlan (1833 – 1911), who was known as the “Great Dissenter”. Harlan’s dissent in the landmark case of Plessy v. Ferguson (1896), set him apart from the prevailing opinion of the time about the abilities of African Americans and their intelligence. John Harlan served on the U.S. Supreme Court from 1877 until 1911. He was born into a slave holding …

Continue reading

Dr. King & The Pursuit of Happiness

When Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated (6:01 p.m. April 4, 1968), he and his team was in Memphis to support black sanitation workers. The struggle for economic equality, a transition from the campaigns that the world had come to know from the leader of the civil rights movement. The civil rights movement more than a decade before Dr. King’s assassination, enjoyed a series of hard fought battles.  The landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision, …

Continue reading

Henry “Box” Brown, & The Underground Railroad

Henry “Box” Brown (b. 1816 – 1889?); On March 30, 1849, William Still, (the conductor of the Underground Railroad) and other members of the Philadelphia Vigilance Committee (a group of abolitionists that worked with runaway slaves to subvert the Fugitive Slave Act) greeted Henry Brown in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 was passed by the United States Congress on September 18, 1850, as a compromise between Southern slave-holders and Northern Free States. …

Continue reading