Dr. King & The Pursuit of Happiness

When Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated (6:01 p.m. April 4, 1968), he and his team was in Memphis to support black sanitation workers. The struggle for economic equality, a transition from the campaigns that the world had come to know from the leader of the civil rights movement. The civil rights movement more than a decade before Dr. King’s assassination, enjoyed a series of hard fought battles.  The landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision, …

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Rev. Kyles, Eyewitness to Dr. King’s Assassination

On March 29, 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and his team of ministers traveled to Memphis, Tennessee to support sanitation workers. Later that week, on April 3, 1968, he spoke at rally at Mason Temple, the central headquarters of the Church of God in Christ Pentecostal Church. The building is named for Bishop Charles Harrison Mason the founder of the Church of God in Christ. Black sanitation workers in Memphis, were discriminated in hiring, …

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James Earl Ray Caught in London

James Earl Ray’s ultimate destination was Rhodesia, Africa. After he assassinated Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Ray’s odyssey from Memphis to London by way of Toronto and his confession then recant for the murder, is worthy of recounting. Not widely known is the chronology of events during the “manhunt” for Ray, following the murder of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on April 4, 1968 in Memphis, Tennessee. Questions remain on national security, crossing international borders, (he …

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Selma; Notes From the Field – Chapter 3, Hwy 80

After Bloody Sunday (March 7, 1965) and Turnaround Tuesday, the task to complete a Selma to Montgomery march still remained. This time, beginning on March 21st, the determined were escorted by the United States Army, federalized Alabama National Guard troops and guarded by two helicopters. One week after Bloody Sunday, on March 15, 1965, President Johnson addressed a joint session of Congress to urge the passage of legislation guaranteeing the passage of the voting rights act. …

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W. E. B. Du Bois

We have chosen to use the image of William Edward Burghardt Du Bois (February 23, 1868 – August 27, 1963) as our avatar and logo because he is the embodiment of an uncompromising  intellectual, a principled black man that could not and would not tolerate the treatment of African Americans during his lifetime. A writer, civil rights activist, historian, and college professor, Du Bois could have lived a comfortable life. but he chose to engage …

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Why We Celebrate Black History Month

Since Carter G. Woodson’s efforts in the 1910’s, and the idea of setting aside a time of year to celebrate the accomplishments of African-Americans, disparaging remarks about his efforts and the idea of documenting and celebrating black accomplishments have been subject to criticism.  Unfortunately even black Americans seem to have found Black History Month inadequate (celebrate 365, they say) or forget about it all together. Some people feel that the time has past for a separate time …

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