James Earl Ray Caught in London

James Earl Ray’s ultimate destination was Rhodesia, Africa. After he assassinated Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Ray’s odyssey from Memphis to London by way of Toronto and his confession then recant for the murder, is worthy of recounting. Not widely known is the chronology of events during the “manhunt” for Ray, following the murder of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on April 4, 1968 in Memphis, Tennessee. Questions remain on national security, crossing international borders, (he …

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Selma; Notes From the Field – Chapter 3, Hwy 80

After Bloody Sunday (March 7, 1965) and Turnaround Tuesday, the task to complete a Selma to Montgomery march still remained. This time, beginning on March 21st, the determined were escorted by the United States Army, federalized Alabama National Guard troops and guarded by two helicopters. One week after Bloody Sunday, on March 15, 1965, President Johnson addressed a joint session of Congress to urge the passage of legislation guaranteeing the passage of the voting rights act. …

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W. E. B. Du Bois

We have chosen to use the image of William Edward Burghardt Du Bois (February 23, 1868 – August 27, 1963) as our avatar and logo because he is the embodiment of an uncompromising  intellectual, a principled black man that could not and would not tolerate the treatment of African Americans during his lifetime. A writer, civil rights activist, historian, and college professor, Du Bois could have lived a comfortable life. but he chose to engage …

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Why We Celebrate Black History Month

Since Carter G. Woodson’s efforts in the 1910’s, and the idea of setting aside a time of year to celebrate the accomplishments of African-Americans, disparaging remarks about his efforts and the idea of documenting and celebrating black accomplishments have been subject to criticism.  Unfortunately even black Americans seem to have found Black History Month inadequate (celebrate 365, they say) or forget about it all together. Some people feel that the time has past for a separate time …

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Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. & Voting Rights

After the Civil War, three amendments were added to the United States Constitution to address the new reality for free blacks.  The 13th forbidding slavery, the 14th guaranteeing all people the same rights and privileges as everyone else and finally the 15th, the right to vote without regard to race or color or previous condition of servitude. The right to vote proved to be elusive for blacks especially in the South. States and local governments, …

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Celebrate King’s Day

The hallmark of change was non-violent change.  Nobel Peace Laureate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. championed a movement that became a world wide model for civil change. Those that disagree with the direction the United States has taken in respect to rights note both the spirit and letter of the law,  have often resorted to violence. Brandishing weapons, taking hostages, even threatening federal agents has become a familiar tactic.  Especially among right-wing zealots. Who would …

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