Blacks And The Party Of The One Percent

  Recently a presidential preference poll leading up to the 2016 elections determined that the candidate representing the party of Lincoln only received 1% support from African-Americans. It’s not always been that way. There was a time early in black enfranchisement when blacks preferred candidates of Lincoln’s newly formed anti-slavery progressive political party. That party left blacks before blacks left that party.  Now the only blacks left, 160 years since the beginnings of Lincoln’s political party are …

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Juneteenth

Terms for the end of Civil War hostilities began at a courthouse in Virginia in April of 1865, but it didn’t end in Texas until June later that year. Slaves continued to work and personal freedoms were ignored because no one got the word.  No social media, no media of any kind, no newspapers for slaves who of course were not allowed to read (outlawed by the Slave Codes). General Robert E. Lee, commander of …

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Why We Celebrate Black History Month

Since Carter G. Woodson’s efforts in the 1910’s, and the idea of setting aside a time of year to celebrate the accomplishments of African-Americans, disparaging remarks about his efforts and the idea of documenting and celebrating black accomplishments have been subject to criticism.  Unfortunately even black Americans seem to have found Black History Month inadequate (celebrate 365, they say) or forget about it all together. Some people feel that the time has past for a separate time …

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Henry “Box” Brown, & The Underground Railroad

Henry “Box” Brown (b. 1816 – 1889?); On March 30, 1849, William Still, (the conductor of the Underground Railroad) and other members of the Philadelphia Vigilance Committee (a group of abolitionists that worked with runaway slaves to subvert the Fugitive Slave Act) greeted Henry Brown in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 was passed by the United States Congress on September 18, 1850, as a compromise between Southern slave-holders and Northern Free States. …

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